Opening Minds through Shakespeare

November 16, 2012 by
Filed under: Education Matters 

This, believe it or not, is a photograph of a year seven pupil improvising Romeo and Juliet. Even more surprising is that this pupil was one of a group that started this Shakespeare workshop only a few hours earlier professing that they either knew nothing about Shakespeare or that what they did know of him was “boring”.

This was how my day began when I visited Windsor school in Germany last week as part of a partnership project between the RSA and SCE (Service Children’s Education). The aim of the partnership is to support SCE as two of its schools in JHQ Rheindahlen are due to close along with the Garrison. The focus at Windsor school is to teach the students about Shakespeare whilst also helping them to develop competences from the RSA’s Opening Minds framework which they can call upon during this challenging time and in their future lives.

The pupils’ initial reaction to a day of Shakespeare reminded me of the way in which I and many of my peers greeted Shakespeare learning at school. However, the workshop that followed could not have been more different. After watching the Globe’s promotional video Stand Up For Shakespeare, in which celebrities, such as Judi Dench, explain that Shakespeare is to be acted and not read, we followed their cue and began improvising scenes before even glancing at a script.

Following the truly inspirational facilitation of our lead partner, SCE’s Performing Arts Consultant Joy Harris, the students were led through a number of exercises that helped them to break through Shakespeare’s intimidating language and recognise emotions and scenarios that are common to all people of all ages and times: children and adults, Tudor subjects and modern day citizens. By mid-morning the students were leaping around the room, brandishing imaginary knives and reciting lines from the play, unscripted.

With the children’s excitement and imaginations ignited, my role – to introduce competences such as ‘risk taking’ and ‘feelings and reactions’ – was made much simpler. The children were fully engaged and able to relate the discussion to a present experience. They were, for example, able to put themselves in Juliet’s shoes and explore the risks that she took in marrying Romeo and taking the poison, and to debate whether her actions were admirable or plain foolish. Through the prism of the play and an exploration of the motives and emotions of the characters, they were able to develop a deeper understanding of the competences.

All of this is even more astonishing when you consider the uncertainty that these children face. Apart from the fact that they will not be in that school next September, many do not know much else about what the next year holds. It is hard to imagine the implications this has for them personally, as well as for engagement and morale within the classroom. A number of children will not be able to see the project to completion and, for one pupil, this was their last day in the school. Despite this, every child actively participated and the staff and the school’s Head fully supported the unique experience that they were able to gain that day.

I also learned a lot from the visit – and not just that Shakespeare is not as boring as I had remembered. The whole experience was an extremely powerful demonstration of how pupils become more engaged in learning if they are doing rather than just listening. This approach may seem more easily applicable to drama than other subjects, such as Maths, but maybe it is this pigeon-holing that we need to break away from.

As I approach the end of what is sadly my last day at the RSA (as I will be moving to a new role at Cubitt), my visit to Windsor has also helped me to reflect on the amazing experiences that I have gained here and to think about how I will utilise them in my next role. Perhaps, though, it will be twenty years down the line that I will draw on something that I have learnt here, and the people that helped form that learning won’t have any idea of its application. In the face of what could easily be a sad and demoralising year, the teachers at SCE remain passionate about ensuring that their students access unique opportunities that they can reflect on and use in the year and years to come.

Comments

  • http://twitter.com/JoyHarris1 Joy Harris

    Excellent blog Karen. The project day was that much richer for your part in it. We will miss working with you. Thank you for making a difference to the lives of our students in SCE.

    We are so pleased to be connected in partnership with Joe and the Education team at RSA. Joy and SCE Students.

  • http://twitter.com/Serge_Nevez PlanetOrion

    Shakespeare is worth of a lifetime

  • Dr Stuart Dyke

    Well done Karen, Joy and the Windsor students. This is exactly the type of stimulating introduction to Shakespeare that KS3 students need. All schools should take note of this valuable partnership between the RSA and SCE, with its support for Forces students in closing schools. How they must have enjoyed the emotional and dramatic challenges of this valuable opportunity. Keep this partnership going.

  • Lynsey

    This partnership is the beginning of a rich and unique learning journey for our KS2 pupils. The children have loved every minute of the Shakespeare workshops they have taken part in so far and can’t wait for the next experiences and adventures we have planned. Collaborating with Globe Education has brought our curriculum to life!

    • http://twitter.com/JoyHarris1 Joy Harris

      I am delighted that Bielefeld School are connecting with the SCE Partnerships we have with Globe Education and the RSA. Fantastic that you are also coming to the Playing Shakespeare Day at The Globe on 22nd March. Our unique pupils in SCE overseas deserve to experience the culture of London and the creativity of The Globe.

      • Lynsey

        Couldn’t agree more Mrs. Joy!